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If I take death into my life, acknowledge it, and face it squarely, I will free myself from the anxiety of death and the pettiness of life - and only then will I be free to become myself.
— Martin Heidegger (via sisyphean-revolt)
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To be properly aware of your finitude—to realise that death happens to you, that it must happen, and may happen at any moment—is to realise that you do not have time to explore all the multiplicity of options which life places before you. What one is compelled to do, therefore, is to determine which life-options are the important, ‘essential’ ones and which are the trivial distractions, the ‘accidental’ time-wasters which life thrusts one’s way.

Grasping one’s finitude is more than simply realising that there is no time to lose. To be able to make the distinction between essential and irrelevant life-options one must, says Heidegger, grasp one’s life as a ‘totality’, as a ‘whole’. But to do that one must ‘anticipate’ one’s death, ‘run forward’, in imagination, to life’s end. Only by positioning oneself at the end of life and grasping it as if it were completed and past, can one grasp it as a whole.

— Julian Young, The Death of God and the Meaning of Life (via ludimagister)
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For we are capable of doing only what we are inclined to do. And again, we truly incline only toward something that in turn inclines toward us, toward our essential being, by appealing to our essential being as the keeper who holds us in our essential being. What keeps us in our essential nature holds us only so long, however, as we for our part keep holding on to what holds us. And we keep holding on to it by not letting it out of our memory. Memory is the gathering of thought.
— 'What is Called Thinking?' by Martin Heidegger. (via philoskaisophos)
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